Like ships that pass in the night.
Hillary Woodman. Studying Fine Art at Wayne State University.
Critique 2: Form Distortion

Having missed a couple days of class and going through some unfortunate things at home, I was thrown into this project confused and full of emotions. It took a long time to process and decided where to start, once I finally got the idea and the drive, I couldn’t stop the different ideas from flowing out. I had so many different visions of how this project would look before I started, fortunate or unfortunate, the project did not end up how it was originally intended. I feel like that’s sometimes the point of art, it can be a learning process, that hopefully turns out well in the end. And although it didn’t turn out the way I expected, I am happy with the results and learned a ton in the process.
    One important thing I learned is that projects, really like anything else in life, don’t always play out the way you would imagine it to. I thought I had come up with some great ideas only to be let down by multiple failures of trying to put those ideas into action. I found out some of my limitations and found I had to be a little more practical(boring).
    In the critique people, myself included, were a little quiet and quite nice. I having looked at my piece for so long, I really started to hate every part of it. I found it to be really nice how people responded to it. Someone mentioned how one of the sides left an open space that they thought took away from the piece. I felt I could have filled that void, but took a different approach to make it more interesting and give it more variety. I really liked the idea of having a lot of different kinds of texture. I also wanted the viewer to have the ability to look in the object just enough to imagine what could be going on inside. The form itself was pretty simple, so I used details to draw in the viewers attention.
    I really enjoyed in the critique when some people said I should put the object on its side. One of the most difficult parts of finishing this piece was figuring out how to join the two forms together and present them. In my original plan I wanted two similar forms and to connect them through the center, but found I was unable to achieve the look I had wanted. So, I had to altar my idea, putting them in the practical arrangement that was presented at the critique. I felt that by laying the object on it’s side left the vulnerable bottom exposed, but also created an more interesting piece.
   

Critique 1: Form Translation

When this first project was introduced, I was quite intimidated. Taking simple materials to create a more complex form can be overwhelming if you have never had experience working with and building three dimensional objects.
    For me the creative process and planning comes really easily. Thinking of ideas on how this object could be built and what might work best was great. The execution of the ideas were a bit more difficult. Being precise and making sure the measurements are correct sometimes just do not work out the way I would like it to. Luckily I had some really great group members to help out and teach me things along the way. I usually feel that group projects hold me back and I can not work in the manner I would normally. That being said, this group project was a great introduction into space design and opened up a lot of possibilities that wouldn’t necessarily have been available if it was a solo project. Working in a group really helped minimize stress while experimenting with new mediums. It also allowed for the opportunity to learn off of each other and to realize strengths and weaknesses.   
    I was really impressed with how well our project came out. I thought our team worked really well together and it seemed to translate in our piece. We wanted it to be minimal and clean while still looking like the object we chose. Dan and I focused most of our attention on the structure and internal pieces. While Chris used his design expertise on the aesthetics of the visible pieces. In the end we each took on different detail tasks and brought it all together.
    The critique was on point with what I thought of our piece. I agree that the black sharpie on the tape was unnecessary. I felt like it drew more attention to the tape then away, like it was intended to do. I also agree with the top detail piece not matching the rest of the piece. It felt like it wasn’t part of the piece, but just a last minute add on. In the critique it was also mentioned that the side compartments where different on one side than the other. Dan at last minute thought of a good solution the give the compartments a little volume and adjusted one side, but there was not enough time to do the other side. Something that was not mentioned in the critique, but I thought lacked, was the detail. There were some parts of the actual object that because of time restraints we had to cut out. If we would have added the detail of the side compartments, I think the piece would have been more interesting to look at. Overall I was very pleased with how the critique went and how the project turned out.
   

Notes

devildoll:

are you fucking kidding me

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